Fire on Cape Cod: Massachusetts Military Reservation Burns (Part 1)

By far the biggest burns we participated in this past year were a pair carried out on the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR). A base that now goes by at least three names depending on who you talk to about it. Over two full days the prescribed burns on the MMR burned ~330 acres, both days we had highly active fire behavior, culminating with flame lengths somewhere around 100 feet high and a smoke column that (apparently) was visible from across the bay in Provincetown (35-40 miles). This entry is going to focus on the first of the two Rx Burns.

During the first of the two burns we were primarily a holding group, our job was to watch one flank of the burn unit and ensure that burning embers in the smoke didn’t light spot fires outside of the unit. What we were able to do if and when those embers did cross the line depended heavily on what the fuel type behind us consisted of. When we had our backs to a large grassy field, we were generally able to stomp out the fires before they grew much larger than a campfire. When we had thick brush or trees to our backs we instead called out for help and focused on staying out of the way of the brush-breakers as they barreled through the underbrush to put out the spot.

One of the brush breakers. The smallest of them could push through a tree with an 8 inch DBH (diameter at breast height), the largest looked like mack-trucks that the folk's in the Mad Max movies had gotten their hands on.

One of the brush breakers. The smallest of them could push through a tree with an 8 inch DBH (diameter at breast height), the largest looked like mack-trucks that the folks in the Mad Max movies had gotten their hands on.

From the first burn. Our spread out holding line.

From the first burn. Our spread out holding line. Thirty seconds after this picture was taken the smoke column rising into the sky pulled a U-turn and descended onto us. The embers it carried lit the grassy field behind us on fire (keeping me too busy to take more pictures).

Luckily for us, the smoke was mostly heading in the other direction, which meant that for a large portion of the day we really didn’t have much to do except watch the fire work its way through the burn unit.

Most of the flames within the first burn were relatively small, 2-4 feet, and were carried by litter and brush.

Most of the flames within the first burn were relatively small, 2-4 feet, and were carried by litter and brush.

Fire behavior on the first burn was largely mild to moderate. There were a few instances of multi-tree torching, but complete stand replacement (when all of the trees in a clump burn and die in the same event) was within the bounds of the burn’s prescription. There are decent ecological reasons for allowing stand replacement, and since this burn was at least partially “for the bunnies,” the burn bosses were happy to let stands that were well within the perimeter ignite.

More line holding, this time with denser fuels on both sides of us.

More line holding, this time with denser fuels on both sides of us.

Igniting the final strip.

Igniting the final strip.

mmr6

This first burn covered around 100 acres, a bit over half of what we’d hoped to do that day, shifting winds and caution kept us from hitting our mark. Day two, which occurred a few weeks later, would more than make up for the day’s potential shortfalls, though. I’ll get to that story next.

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Posted on July 25, 2013, in Americorps Cape Cod and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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